How to Write Sequels: Don’t Screw it Up

Catalyst: Book 1 in the Ronos Trilogy got another solid review today. This one is from a guy I have never met. I don’t even know where he lives. Not only that he came to me asking for a copy to review; I didn’t seek him out.

I get excited every time I read about someone who had a good time reading Catalyst. That’s why I wrote it, so that people would have a fun experience reading it. Now that I’ve gotten positive reviews my goal for Beacon: Book 2 in the Ronos Trilogy is fully formed. It’s simple.

Don’t screw it up.

Right now there is a small, slowly increasing group of people who are eagerly anticipating the release of Beacon. My job is to not screw it up for them. I have to extend the good times they had reading Catalyst for another book and eventually the entire trilogy.

Don’t screw it up means making sure the characters stay consistent with Catalyst as well as continue to grow in a believable natural way. It means making sure there is enough mystery in the story to keep the audience reading. It means increasing the antagonism. It means not letting the quality of my grammar and syntax be distracting to the reader. It means making sure the cover for Beacon is as awesome as the cover for Catalyst. It means paying off some of the mysteries that were set up in Catalyst as well as subtlety getting into bigger mysteries.

The good news is that today was a good writing day and I got a lot of work done on Beacon (I can’t say the same for my essay). I’m still on track to get Beacon to you by the end summer. In the meantime you should read Catalyst and write a review about it. It could win you an awesome prize.

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4 Responses to How to Write Sequels: Don’t Screw it Up

  1. “Don’t screw it up” = the reason why I haven’t finished the sequel to Imminent Danger. I know it’s not as good, and I can’t figure out why, and thus I hem and haw over it and never get anything done. Sigh.

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